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Causes teenage dating violence

"Well," I huffed, sensing an opportunity to finally yell at him, "what would you call it? " 'Reckless' sounds like you're not paying attention. I made a deliberate point of doing this on an empty stretch of dry interstate, in broad daylight, with good sight lines and no traffic. —and revealed an answer that surprised almost everyone.

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When this development proceeds normally, we get better at balancing impulse, desire, goals, self-interest, rules, ethics, and even altruism, generating behavior that is more complex and, sometimes at least, more sensible.It was the brain scans she took while people took the test.Compared with adults, teens tended to make less use of brain regions that monitor performance, spot errors, plan, and stay focused—areas the adults seemed to bring online automatically.And by age 20, their brains respond to this task much as the adults' do.Luna suspects the improvement comes as richer networks and faster connections make the executive region more effective.But at times, and especially at first, the brain does this work clumsily. Beatriz Luna, a University of Pittsburgh professor of psychiatry who uses neuroimaging to study the teen brain, used a simple test that illustrates this learning curve.

Luna scanned the brains of children, teens, and twentysomethings while they performed an antisaccade task, a sort of eyes-only video game where you have to stop yourself from looking at a suddenly appearing light.

The brain doesn't actually grow very much during this period.

It has already reached 90 percent of its full size by the time a person is six, and a thickening skull accounts for most head growth afterward.

This let the adults use a variety of brain resources and better resist temptation, while the teens used those areas less often and more readily gave in to the impulse to look at the flickering light—just as they're more likely to look away from the road to read a text message.

If offered an extra reward, however, teens showed they could push those executive regions to work harder, improving their scores.

This revelation suggested both a simplistic, unflattering explanation for teens' maddening behavior—and a more complex, affirmative explanation as well.